Mindfulness Activities For Children

Please read the introduction below before downloading this resource.

mindfulness practices for children Mindfulness: Practices For Children

Edition One: The Basics – 2015 Edition.

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Introduction:

What is mindfulness?

Mindfulness is concentrating on what is at the forefront of your mind, in the present moment, with insight & compassion. Mindfulness practices are often intentional and systemic ways of developing a compassionate and insightful presence to an activity.

Focus on the breath is a key facet of mindfulness practice. Neuroscience shows that this makes us aware of the subjectiveness and transient nature of thoughts and emotions, rather than them being something unmoveable and permanent.

It allows there to be space between day-to-day stimulus and automatic reaction.

Stimulus ->           ! ! !        -> Reaction

Stimulus -> Space/Time -> Response

How this resource should be used

The teaching of mindfulness practices to children is actually only a small aspect of what constitutes a ‘mindful pedagogy’ and bringing all the possible benefits of mindfulness to children.

Other important factors to consider are:

You as an educator having a practice. Children benefit most from mindfulness if their teacher practices it themselves. By having a mindfulness practice of your own you create a compassionate and nurturing environment for children to learn in. It also means you have a strong ‘subject knowledge’ for which to fall back on and not only rely on these type of resources (or pedagogical knowledge). The best teachers are the ones that have a combination of good subject knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and passion for what they teach. Mindfulness should be no different. There is nothing wrong with learning along with the children for a while but for more details on creating your own practice please visit my website. mindfulintheclassroom.wordpress.com

The school having a ‘culture’ of mindfulness. If this material is taught out of context in a school not based on an ethos of mindfulness and a school which doesn’t hold the concepts of mindfulness in highest of regards – benefits of these activities will remain limited. Again, if you are looking to provide a ‘mindful culture’ in your school please visit my website for more details.

Continue your own CPD. Continue to be creative and look to develop your understanding of mindfulness. Create new ideas, research and look for the connections between mindfulness and subjects within the curriculum.  Please share these and any other questions or experience on my website or via twitter @ryoungdharma or the hashtag #mindfuledchat for great ideas.

Finally enjoy yourself!

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Links between children learning programming & mindfulness.

Mindfulness & Computing

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Computational thinking skills are at the heart of the new computing curriculum in UK. It’s a powerful way of solving problems. It will now be a tool in the problem solving toolset that pupils leave school with. It will equip them to not only understand the digital world, but will also compliment their understanding of mindfulness and the human world.

Computational thinking or ‘computer-like’ thinking is to use computational or computational like models where pupils act out computation in different situations. When computers ‘think’, it is similar to being in a state of mindfulness because

  1. They have to ensure they’re in the present moment or else the model breaks.
  2. They have to be aware of every step they take in the series or else the same problems arise.

Example:

A programming lesson where children are asked to write the complete instructions for making a jam sandwich for a robot to carry out. They will naturally carry out the task themselves trying to note down everything they do as part of the process. This is a mindful activity and is a metaphor for children to understand how computers think.

Computational thinking makes for a much more interesting subject than if computing were just about programming – it is much more than that! These skills are not in themselves unique and as explained above are transferable to mindfulness teaching.

Computational thinking skills can most definitively be brought into life problems just as mindful skills can – indeed both are incredibly comparable. Computation is something you could argue monks and nuns have been attempting to achieve for thousands of years.

‘Algorithmic thinking’ is at the heart of this. The core idea is that the solution to a problem isn’t just getting an answer; it is the algorithm – the process. Just because you have completed a Rubik’s cube, doesn’t mean you have solved it. Just because you have got angry at someone doesn’t mean you have solved your friendship issue and nor is the solution to life the number 42. – It’s about viewing, editing ‘debugging’ and improving the processes.

The teaching of algorithms has already been happening in primary schools for years. When we learn how to do addition or multiplication we are just learning an algorithm. Once you have an algorithm for doing multiplication you can multiply any numbers together as long as we carefully follow the steps. We aren’t always good at doing that which is why many of us find maths hard. Of course following instructions precisely is exactly what computers are good at, and that is why computational thinking is linked to computing, but it can transform the way we think about human work too.

Computational thinkers gain an understanding of the world about them that makes them able to model things from a variety of perspectives and this compliments mindful activity. Mindful activity should also help produce better computational thinkers. There are all sorts of activities that may be viewed as computational processes, eating a tangerine, cleaning your teeth, washing up, drinking a cup of tea and dare I say even meditation. Instructive in different ways, computational thinking will be usable for children throughout their lives.