Nursery Rhymes, Oral Traditional & Mindfulness

decameron1Language, ritual and culture influence all oral traditions. Nursery rhymes and songs make up a large part of these traditions. I believe there is more to it though. Special forms of language have always been important in the promotion of interdependence. The concept of interdependence is a key facet of mindfulness. These often take the form of chant, song, dance and ritual. The language of culture is usually highly thought of, firstly because it is, in fact, memorable, and secondly because it is designed to have a powerful and lasting effect on our development of a collective self or ‘enculturation’.

stortell

Historically most oral tradition came as a result of lack of print or its use was centred around religious and social custom. This is, in the most part, no longer the case. Little is left of that great wealth of common cultural experience which used to be so important to early education. We can not and should not expect that the hymns of the Bible begin to ring out across schools or that children begin each day with Tibetan chants – but there are benefits to the interdependent nature such acts give and should not be lost. We should look to keep this alive.

00577-MEDAn important aspect of oral tradition is of course that it is largely learned in union situations – and gains in its social meaning from that ‘togetherness’ – that ‘interdependent spirit’. Chant, song, dance and linguistic rituals are mindful because they tend to be rhythmic and set to some form of chant or melody which often focuses the mind. Chant, song, dance and linguistic ritual are among the most powerful forms of human learning; primitively satisfying, deeply memorable and globally meaningful. Much of its power comes from the sense of security generated by repetition, familiarity and universality.

***

So why not sing a nursery rhyme or take a dance in class more often – no matter what the age.

Advertisements